Coos Forest Protective Association
Graze Burning

 

Graze Burning

Graze burning serves as a fire prevention tool by removing fuel loads that can create large fires. The Coos Forest Protective Association oversees graze burning during fire season on private land in Coos, Curry, and Western Douglas County.

Ranchers wishing to graze burn, need a plan in place before the actual burn takes place. Things to consider in your plan are fuel types, topography and surrounding vegetation. If you haven’t burned before then you will need a CFPA Officer visit the site. The forest officer will establish rules and guidelines for the burn.

A dozer trail is typically eight feet wide and removes all vegetation down to mineral soil, where nothing remains to burn. Because disc trails can leave remnants of vegetation behind, these types of trails are not recommended. Call CFPA at (541) 267-3161 a few days in advance, to have a site inspection and to complete required paperwork.

A burn plan will then be implemented stating the best time to burn and the number of people, water, hand tools and other equipment that will be required to conduct the burn. CFPA dispatch will be notified of date, address and/or legal description, acres, and ignition time and will contact the detection center, appropriate 911 Centers, and other agencies of a controlled burn taking place.

The participation of CFPA equipment and personnel will be determined based on weather and fire activity in the district. Having the CFPA crew and engine is not part of the conditions of the permit, nor does it replace any of the equipment or personnel that the permittee must provide.

A permit does not relieve the landowner of any liability if the graze burn escapes and causes damage to an adjacent landowner or third party. The landowner could be held liable for any and all fire suppression costs if he/she is negligent in the escape of the fire. One example of negligence is not following the instructions on the permit. Even if a permittee is not negligent, the permittee can still be liable for any extra fire costs based on the causes.

It is recommended that anyone planning to burn should contact surrounding neighbors ahead of time. Might also be a good idea to check your liability insurance that would cover your burning activity.


Links For Graze Burn Information

Why we burn pastures

Pasture and Grazing Management

Example of CFPA Graze Form